Truck accidents are more dangerous than regular car accidents. The sheer size, weight and number of moving parts involved create complexity and increased risk for injury and death for the parties involved.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the Highway Loss Data Institute conducted surveys in 2018 that breaks down the deaths that occur as a result of large truck accidents.

Fatalities in truck accidents

That year, 4,136 people lost their lives in a crash with a large truck. The numbers show that when a passenger vehicle crashes with a commercial truck, the occupants of the smaller vehicle are far more at risk. 96% of deaths in those accidents were those in passenger vehicles.

When and where truck accidents happen

Research shows that most truck accident deaths happen during the morning and early afternoon, with 50% occurring between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. They also found that more truck accidents happen during the week, while non-truck accidents occur on the weekend. Every day between Monday and Friday had 16-17% of all truck accidents.

How often alcohol is involved

Of all who lost their lives in accidents with trucks, the study found that more passenger vehicle drivers than truck drivers were intoxicated. They found that of truck drivers who were fatally injured in 2018, only 3% had a Blood Alcohol Content of .08% or more. Of passenger drivers who died, 29% had a BAC of .08% or above.

Mississippi truck driver fatalities

In Mississippi, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety identified the fatalities that occurred in accidents throughout 2018. While only 2% were those in large trucks, 39% of deaths were those in cars and 34% were in pickup trucks or SUVs.

Truck accidents differ from typical car accidents in many ways: risk of injury and death increases, there are many more factors that come into play and the legal action that comes after is often far more complicated. If you are injured in or lose a loved one to a trucking accident, talk to a lawyer as soon as possible.